calvin

Taproot Road Song #300 – “Like Lightening” by Lucero

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Feb 202012
 

You gotta like a song that starts out with an old-timey acoustic piano riff which leads into power chord driven guitars and blaring trumpets and that’s what you get from Lucero‘s”Like Lightening” from their Women & Work CD.

WCOM Play List for Feb 13, 2012

 wcom playlist  Comments Off on WCOM Play List for Feb 13, 2012
Feb 132012
 

wcom play list logoHowdy,

I’m happy to be adding Maynard and the Musties into rotation this week. Reminds me of the Felice Brothers, you know, before they went off the deep end.  Also featuring one of my all time favorite and much under appreciated soul singers, Ruby Johnson.

My interview guest this week is Jon Neufeld from Jackstraw. Woo!

As usual, local listeners can tune into WCOM 103.5 FM and everyone else can tune into the WCOM webcast.

Cheap Cigar / Maynard and the Musties / Cheap Cigar / 4:00
Sorry Times / Trailer Bride / Trailer Bride / 3:12
When My Love Comes Down / Ruby Johnson / Stax 1959-1968 #6 / 2:48

*** interview guest Jon Neufeld from Jackstraw ***

How Does A Crow Fly / Lincoln Durham / The Shovel Vs. The Howling Bones / 2:36
I Don’t Want To Take A Chance / Mary Wells / The Ultimate collection / 2:48
Nothing / The Far West / The Far West / 2:38
Runnin’ With The Fools / Two Dollar Pistols / Hands Up! / 3:08
How Many Times Have You Broken My Heart? / Norah Jones / The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams / 3:32
Blue Eyes / Uncle Tupelo / Conmemorativo | A Tribute To Gram Parsons / 2:59
Say It / Steve Cropper & Bettye LaVette / Dedicated – A Salute To The 5 Royales / 2:25
The Prisoner / Mike June & The Wilson Street Refugees / Exile On Wilson Street / 3:33
Somethin’ in the Water / Westbound / Blackjack Road / 2:48
For All I Know / James McMurtry / It Had To Happen / 3:58
Willie And Laura Mae Jones / Tony Joe White / The Best Of Tony Joe White (Featuring Polk Salad Annie) / 4:57
Dirtfloorcracker / Mofro / Lochloosa / 3:37
The Dirty Boogie / The Brian Setzer Orchestra / The Dirty Boogie / 3:14

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Cheap Cigar by Maynard and the Musties

 reviews  Comments Off on Cheap Cigar by Maynard and the Musties
Feb 132012
 

Imagine a band that has had a little too much to drink and has listened to a little too much Felice Brothers and you’d come pretty close to Maynard and the Musties. The music on Maynard and the Musties’ Cheap Cigar is loose and worn and boozy. Every note is a surprise. Every line is sad but true. This is highly recommended as good hanging out and drinking music.  Their CD is not yet on iTunes but will be soon. Meanwhile you can hear cuts from it on their band camp site.

 

 

Feb 132012
 

Langhorne Slim has an infectious optimism, even when he’s singing the blues. I don’t know how he manages to do that. I think it’s something about the earnestness in his voice and this week’s road song, “Restless” is a great example.

“Restless” on iTunes
Taproot Song Of The Week on Spotify

Langhorne Slim – “Restless” from Matthew Achterberg on Vimeo.

Feb 132012
 

Laurie MacAllister, Abbie Gardner, and Molly Venter of Red Molly talk about their music backgrounds, the appeal of female trios, the excitement of playing Merlefest, the appeal their music has for the NYC coffeehouse crowd, and the stories behind three of their songs on the CD Light In The Sky.

Red Molly

TPR#75 Red Molly – Interview and Music (MP3)

Sponsor

NC Hops and Roots FestNorth Carolina Hops and Roots Fest

Show Notes:

Red Molly’s Light In The Sky on iTunes

Red Molly’s Web Site

Red Molly Interview Recap

Laurie MacAllister introduces herself. Laurie says that singing was the thing she was most interested when he was a little girl. When she was 28, she was in a corporate job but decided to leave that job to pursue being a singer/songwriter. About 6 years later she met Abbie at a folk festival and formed Red Molly. Laurie talks about how supportive her friends were when she decided to leave her job and start in music. Laurie talks about how she’d been doing coffee house gigs for a while before she left and her friends and co-workers would come to her shows. And when she announced to her co-workers that she was leaving her corporate job to pursue music, she received 40-50 emails of support from them. Laurie said she printed all of them out and she still has them to this day.

Abbie Gardner introduces herself. She says she has her parents to thank for getting into music. Her father is a jazz musician, playing piano and trombone in Dixieland bands. Abbie talks about how her first foray into music was classical flute but how she liked to interpret pieces too much to be a classical musician. She worked for a while as an occupational therapist while she discovered song writing and guitar. Eventually she fell in love with the dobro, which is still her favorite instrument.

Molly Venter introduces herself. Her mom was the musician in the family.Her mom taught her and her brother their first chords and they would harmonize together. Right after college she mad a solo album and moved to Austin to jump into the scene there. She put out some more albums and did some touring, living out of her van. She opened for Red Molly several times and they asked her to join the band when they had an opening in their line-up.

Laurie MacAllister talks about how audiences love female trios and even though you can name a few of trios there aren’t that many of them. Red Molly stands out from the usual thousands of solo singer/songwriters due to the interplay of their voices which the audiences really like.

Laurie MacAllister introduces “Walk Beside Me.” It’s a song that Abbie introduced her to from an album called Real Time by Tim O’Brien and Darrell Scott. Back in 2005 or 2006 Abbie played the CD for Laurie as they were traveling around and “Walk Beside Me” was one of songs they both loved. The theme of the song is “Walk Beside Me until our pathways do divide.” They changed the word “brother” to “sister” and the song became applicable to the band.

[plays “Walk Beside Me”]

Laurie talks about doing shows in the New York City area. She said that you might not expect folks in that area to like their rootsy, almost country sound, but they do. For one thing there is so much variety in that area you can find an audience for almost anything. That, combined with the energy and the fun in their shows, they were able to build up a following. The band found that doing a fun, high energy show works regardless of whether you are playing to an NYC crowd or a bluegrass festival and so they don’t have to change their shows much for different types of gigs.

Abbie Gardner introduces the song “Hello, Goodbye,” which is a song she wrote with her father. On this song, she’d written the melody and the bridge and all the words, but she was stuck on the chord progression. She was stuck because the song had a “swingy” feel to it and she hadn’t written that kind of song before. She took it to her dad because that’s the type of music he performs.  He sat down at his old stand-up piano and she started playing the song. He was able to immediately pick up on it and developed the chord progression for her. They had never co-written songs before and so that was fun for her. Her father plays on this track as well as some other tracks from Light In The Sky.

[plays “Hello, Goodbye”]

Abbie Gardner talks about playing Merlefest in 2010 and 2011. She talks about standing back stage and being mere feet away from Jerry Douglas playing his with Omar Hakim on drums and Viktor Krauss on bass. It was a special set that they were plying for the festival. So there are many performances and artist combinations you don’t get the hear anywhere else. Abbie talks about how they enjoyed and were honored to have Dr. Greg Liszt, the banjo player from Crooked Still play with them on stage. They got a kick out of seeing themselves on the big jumbo TV screens at the event.

Abbie talks about some of the other festival highlights of theirs including the Sisters Folk Festival in Oregon, the Bristol Rhythm and Roots Festival, and of course the Falcon Ridge Festival where they formed. Abbie talks about how they started out just playing at the camp site and then they entered the new artist competition and won and then they earned a Saturday slot on the main program. Abbie also just found out they will be playing the RockyGrass Festival in Colorado and she is excited about that one because she used to go the the academy they have the week before the festival to learn from some of the dobro greats.

Molly introduces “Hold It All.” This is a song she wrote shortly after joining the band. She wrote this song thinking about “how you can get a dose of really wonderful stuff and a dose of some not so wonderful stuff all on the same day sometimes and how you can feel all of it all at once.”

[plays “Hold It All”]

Molly talks about how the usual way they work is that they write songs individually and bring them to the group and it’s not until they start working out the harmonies that they can determine if a song is going to work for them or not. But more recently, Abbie has done quite a bit of co-writing and Molly has been dabbling in co-writing as well. The band is starting to work toward doing more co-writing together.

Get More!

Legal

The Taproot Radio Podcast is copyright 2011 by Taproot Media. The music and interviews in this episode are used with permission of the artists. The Taproot Theme music is called “Meltdown Man” by Derek K. Miller of Penmachine.com. The episode as a whole is copyright 2011 by Taproot Media.
Photo Credit: Annabel Braithwaite

Feedback

If you have any feedback for this episode or any other episode, please send mail to feedback@taprootradio.com.

Taproot Radio News #299

 rotation  Comments Off on Taproot Radio News #299
Feb 122012
 

Taproot Radio News LogoRotation #299, February 13, 2012

read: http://www.taprootradio.com

listen: http://www.live365.com/stations/cspowers?play=1
live: Monday nights at 9pm eastern on WCOM: http://www.wcomfm.org
feedback: director@taprootradio.com

Howdy,

Imagine a band that has had a little too much to drink and has listened to a little too much Felice Brothers and you’d come pretty close to Maynard and the Musties. The music on Maynard and the Musties’ Cheap Cigar is loose and worn and boozy. Every note is a surprise. Every line is sad but true. This is highly recommended as good hanging out and drinking music.  Their CD is not yet on iTunes but will be soon. Meanwhile you can hear cuts from it on the Taproot Radio Current Rotation list on Spotify.

On episode 74 of the Taproot Podcast, Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing from Hymn For Her, how they met and started making music together; their evolution from folk duo to lo-fi rock band; and recording in their airstream trailer.

Speaking of the podcast, I’m happy to announce that the North Carolina Hops and Roots Festival is a sponsor for the podcast again this year. This festival celebrates local beer, wine, food, and music and I’m proud to be associated with it. Check them out if you are in the area.

I’m drowning in CD submissions these days and it’s always interesting to see what people do to make their submission stand out. I have more branded beer bottle openers, stickers, post cards, refrigerator magnets, etc etc than I can shake a stick at. Some folks tie up their CDSs in ribbon as if it’s a precious gift. Others include hand written notes from the musicians. It’s all appreciated. But don’t forget the basics. This week I received a CD that showed promise, at least based on the packaging. But there was no CD in the case! Oops!

And while I’m on the subject. I heartily endorse electronic distribution of review copies. Big fan. But please please, make sure the meta data is attached to the MP3 files using MP3 tags so I can eaily import it into my music management system.  Thanks and keep the good music coming!

Dig Deep,
Calvin

Taproot Road Song 299

Langhorne Slim has an infectious optimism, even when he’s singing the blues. I don’t know how he manages to do that. I think it’s something about the earnestness in his voice and this week’s road song, “Restless” is a great example.

Recent Podcast Episodes

Episode 70 – Lydia Loveless talks about how much she enjoyed going into the sound booth to “scream until I almost passed out” when recording her CD, Indestructible Machine; her admiration for the songwriting of Sunny Sweeney and the guitar work of James Wilsey; her advice to aspiring artists; and why punk rock wasn’t a rebellion for her.

Episode 71 – John Lilly talks about meeting Bill Kirchen and Bill’s help on his most recent CD, Cold Comfort; how he funded the CD by winning a songwriting contest; working at the Country Music Hall of Fame and getting to visit “the cathedral of Country Music”; his yearly Hank Williams Tribute show; and introduces us to three songs on his Cold Comfort CD.
Episode 72, Lee Briante of The Far West talks about the importance of having video and internet media available for today’s audience; how it made him feel to move to Los Angeles; and how recording in an American Legion hall brought their debut self-titled CD to life.

Episode 73 – Lincoln Durham talks about his residency at Gruene Hall, why he can’t write love songs, his long path from playing fiddle to Son House and Fred McDowell, and why he wrote a creepy songs about ne’er-do-well characters playing forty

Episode 74 – Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing from Hymn For Her, how they met and started making music together; their evolution from folk duo to lo-fi rock band; and recording in their airstream trailer.

Recent Adds

 

  • Finished With You / Ashley Robertson / Finished With You / 4:37

  • Uphill / Julie Lee and the Baby Daddies / Julie Lee and the Baby Daddies / 4:44

  • Today Ain’t Too Late / Planetary Nights / Today Ain’t Too Late / 3:00

  • Mocha Jaydene / Planetary Nights / Today Ain’t Too Late / 4:36

  • Rollin’ On Again / Planetary Nights / Today Ain’t Too Late / 3:38

  • Cheap Cigar / Maynard and the Musties / Cheap Cigar / 4:00

  • Rock This Little Boat / Maynard and the Musties / Cheap Cigar / 3:13

  • Pretty & Cryin’ / Maynard and the Musties / Cheap Cigar / 4:41

  • After the Game / Maynard and the Musties / Cheap Cigar / 3:17

  • Makin’ Time / Westbound / Blackjack Road / 2:54

  • Delta River Line / Westbound / Blackjack Road / 3:42

  • Somethin’ in the Water / Westbound / Blackjack Road / 2:48

  • Things We Dare Not Tell / Kath Buckell / Faces Do Not Change / 4:16

This Week’s Rotation

 

Taproot Play Lists on iTunes

This week’s play list on Live365

This week’s play list on Spotify

 

  • Somethin’ in the Water / Westbound / Blackjack Road / 2:48
  • Cold Dog Soup / James McMurtry / This One’s For Him: A Tribute To Guy Clark [Disc 1] / 3:48
  • “Baby Doll”  / Charlie Gracie / “Baby Doll” Single / 3:05
  • Cheap Cigar / Maynard and the Musties / Cheap Cigar / 4:00
  • Finished With You / Ashley Robertson / Finished With You / 4:37
  • Jebediah Wilcox / Johnson County / Johnson County / 4:21
  • Sorry Times / Trailer Bride / Trailer Bride / 3:12
  • The Prisoner / Mike June & The Wilson Street Refugees / Exile On Wilson Street / 3:33
  • Uphill / Julie Lee and the Baby Daddies / Julie Lee and the Baby Daddies / 4:44
  • He’s Got Himself A Young Girl (And He Can’t Keep Up) / The Long Ryders / The Long Ryders Anthology: Looking for Lewis and Clark [Disc 2] / 2:57
  • Return Of The Grievous Angel / Gram Parsons / Under Your Spell Again [Disc II] / 3:52
  • Breakdown / Audra Mae and The Almighty Sound / EP / 3:19
  • Come Home Blues / Mark Pickerel And His Praying Hands / Snake in the Radio / 3:49
  • Danny and Maria / Drew Nelson / Tilt-A-Whirl / 3:21
  • I Don’t Want To Take A Chance / Mary Wells / The Ultimate collection / 2:48
  • Nothing / The Far West / The Far West / 2:38
  • Runnin’ With The Fools / Two Dollar Pistols / Hands Up! / 3:08
  • The Dirty Boogie / The Brian Setzer Orchestra / The Dirty Boogie / 3:14
  • Today Ain’t Too Late / Planetary Nights / Today Ain’t Too Late / 3:00
  • For All I Know / James McMurtry / It Had To Happen / 3:58
  • Head to Toe / Pokey LaFarge & the South City Three / Middle of Everywhere / 2:32
  • How Many Times Have You Broken My Heart? / Norah Jones / The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams / 3:32
  • If You Want Me To / Deadstring Brothers / Silver Mountain / 4:33
  • Willie And Laura Mae Jones / Tony Joe White / The Best Of Tony Joe White (Featuring Polk Salad Annie) / 4:57
  • Take My Possessions / Charlie Sohmer / Dying To Have A Good Time / 3:59
  • Dirtfloorcracker / Mofro / Lochloosa / 3:37
  • Boogie Real Low / Joel Dasilva And The Midnight Howl / Joel Dasilva And The Midnight Howl / 3:59
  • Cranky Mulatto / The Gourds / Noble Bonus Tracks / 3:21
  • Everything I Do / Whiskeytown / Strangers Almanac / 4:32
  • Haunted / The Gourds / Old Mad Joy / 3:49
  • Mexicali Rainsong / Paladino / Paladino / 3:44
  • Let’s Get Wide Open / Doug Prescott / The Journey & The Deep Blue Sea / 4:10
  • Montana / Hymn For Her / Lucy & Wayne And The American Stream / 3:37
  • Muddy Water / Aretha Franklin / Aretha Sings The Blues / 2:32
  • Ol’ 97 / Randy Thompson / Collected / 4:12
  • Save My Soul / Thieving Birds / Thieving Birds / 4:45
  • Things We Dare Not Tell / Kath Buckell / Faces Do Not Change / 4:16
  • How Does A Crow Fly / Lincoln Durham / The Shovel Vs. The Howling Bones / 2:36
  • Invisible Riverside / Ryan Adams / Ashes & Fire / 4:49
  • I Hear A Symphony / Diana Ross and The Supremes / The Ultimate Collection / 2:44
  • I’m The Man Who Loves You / Wilco / Yankee Hotel Foxtrot / 3:56
  • Wedding Day / Alejandro Escovedo / A Man Under The Influence / 3:54
  • Blue Eyes / Uncle Tupelo / Conmemorativo | A Tribute To Gram Parsons / 2:59
  • The Honeymoon / Langhorne Slim / Langhorne Slim / 2:03
  • Say It / Steve Cropper & Bettye LaVette / Dedicated – A Salute To The 5 Royales / 2:25
  • Stripped / Lou Ford / Sad, But Familiar / 3:28
  • Time / The Greencards / This Is Americana Volume 2 / 4:33
  • Wonder Woman / Elvis Costello & Allen Toussaint / The River In Reverse / 3:08
  • Rockin’ My Life Away (Alternate Take) / George Thorogood & The Destroyers / Greatest Hits: 30 Years of Rock / 3:28
  • Preachin’ Blues (Up Jumped The Devil) / Robert Johnson / The Centennial Collection / 2:52
  • When My Love Comes Down / Ruby Johnson / Stax 1959-1968 #6 / 2:48
  • Another Story / The Damn Quails / Down the Hatch / 3:33
 Posted by at 9:09 am
Feb 062012
 

On episode 74 of the Taproot Podcast, Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing from Hymn For Her, talk about how they met and started making music together; their evolution from folk duo to lo-fi rock band; and recording in their airstream trailer.

Hymn For Her

TPR#74 Hymn For Her – Interview and Music (MP3)

 

Sponsor

NC Hops and Roots Fest

NC Hops and Roots Fest

Show Notes

Hymn For Her on iTunes

Hymn For Her web site

Show Recap

Wayne Waxing and Lucy Tight talk about how they met and became the band known as Hymn For Her. Lucy was working in a music store In Philadelphia and Wayne would come in and buy strings. And Wayne was working in a sub shop and she’d go in and buy subs. Wayne says they almost called the band “Stirngs and Hoagies.”  Wayne says he’d go to the music store and play songs for Lucy there in the guitar store and sometimes she’d sing along with the harmonies. And eventually they started writing sogns together.

They talk about Hymn For Her’s CD “Lucy and Wayne and the Amairican Stream.” CD and how it came to be named that. Wayne introduces “Slips” which is about the dualism one feels when you are living nomadically. Wanting to get off the road when your moving and wanting to get back on the road when you’re home.

[Plays “Slips”]

Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing talk about recording Hymn For Her’s CD in their Airstream trailer which doubles as their home while they are on the road traveling from gig to gig. Wayne says they like to park at a campground start a fire people will “pull up a log and pass around the guitar.”

Lucy introduces the Hymn For Her’s song “Not,” which is a song about unrequited love. Being in love with someone and not having that love returned. If you listen closely you can hear the rain on the roof of the Airstream trailer. At first they thought they were going to have to stop and wait for the rain to pass. But then they decided that the rain added to the sadness of the song

Lucy and Wayne talk about their deliberate lof-fi sound. For example they have a cigar box car that they feature on almost every track. Before they introduced the cigarbox guitar their music rocked more and became less folky. Lucy talks about how an instrument will tell you where to go musically. Wayne talks about how recording in the Airstream gave it a lo-fi sound. They started as a folk duo but wanted rock out some. So they got a kick drum and a hi hat and that was fun for them.  And then they added the cigar box guitar.  With those instruments, the overall sound started getting that dirty sound and then they decided that as a result the microphones sounded too clean so they got a bullet mic to go along with the sound. The bullet microphone sounds like an old transistor radio.

Lucy and Wayne talk about one of the heaviest songs on Hymn For Her’s CD, “Montana.” This song is more about someone who is desperate and controlling and won’t give up on the relationship. It’s about some friends of theirs. They talk about playing it to wake up the dead.

[plays “Montana”]

Lucy talks about playing the Americana Music Fest and their upcoming European tour to the Belgium and the Netherlands. It’s their first time over there.

Lucy and Wayne also talk about their kid on the cover the CD and she’ll some times sing “Don’t Fence Me In” at an encor of a recent gig.

Get More!

Legal

The Taproot Radio Podcast is copyright 2011 by Taproot Media. The music and interviews in this episode are used with permission of the artists. The Taproot Theme music is called “Meltdown Man” by Derek K. Miller of Penmachine.com. The episode as a whole is copyright 2011 by Taproot Media.

Feedback

If you have any feedback for this episode or any other episode, please send mail to feedback@taprootradio.com.